Sioux Falls Atheists
Sioux Falls Atheists and Atheism, Agnostics and Humanism

Sioux Falls Atheists endorse Scientific Secrets for a Powerful Memory
for showing how we can train ourselves to have a better memory
for helping to deal with the more complex world of today.

Scientific Secrets for a Powerful Memory
Lectures by Professor Peter M. Vishton

Scientific Secrets for a Powerful Memory (2012)
6 lectures, 3 hours
Scientific Secrets for a Powerful Memory at TheGreatCourses.com

What was the name of your first pet? Where did you put your house keys? How do you get to work every morning? Most likely, you didn't need to look up the answers to these questions. You remembered them. Memory is, without a doubt, the most powerful (and practical) tool of everyday life. By linking both your past and your future, memory gives you the power to plan, to reason, to perceive, and to understand. As long as thinking and insight are important in how we live our lives, memory will be critical as well. And the better your memory, the more information you'll have at your immediate disposal and the better your thinking will be.

Yet while all of us have an amazing capacity for memory, there are plenty of times when it seems to fail us. Why does this happen? And how can you fix it?

According to award-winning Professor Peter M. Vishton of The College of William & Mary, an engaging cognitive scientist who has spent decades studying the secrets of human memory, the problem is simple. "Our brains were not really built for the types of memory challenges we give them in classrooms, offices, and throughout our daily lives," he says. "So the central trick to enhancing the power of your memory is to transform things that are hard to remember into things that are easier for your brain to encode and later recall.”

This insight lies at the heart of his captivating course Scientific Secrets for a Powerful Memory. In just six engaging and interactive lectures, you'll explore the real research (not the fads) on how memory functions - and then apply these findings to help you make better use of the memory abilities you have. By tapping into a series of scientifically proven strategies, tricks, and techniques, and by practicing them through dynamic exercises led by Professor Vishton, you'll emerge from the end of this short course with the ability to process information more effectively and to increase your chance of remembering almost anything you want.

Peter M. Vishton is Associate Professor of Psychology at The College of William and Mary. He received his B.A. in Psychology and Computer Science from Swarthmore College and his Ph.D. in Psychology and Cognitive Science from Cornell fro Developmental and Learning Sciences at the Nation Science Foundation. His research interest include perception and motor systems of the brain. He has been publishing in the top journals in the field of psychology, including Science, Psychological Science, the Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, and Experimental Brain Research.

6 Lectures - 30 minutes each

1: Your Amazing Prehistoric Memory 4: Why and When We Forget
2: Encoding Information with Images 5: Keeping Your Whole Brain in Peak Condition
3: Maximizing Short- and Long-Term Memory 6: Human Memory Is Reconstruction, Not Replay

 

2-8-16 Your brain activity for memory tasks changes with the seasons
Your brain activity for memory tasks changes with the seasons
It's well known that for some people, mood is tied to the time of year. Now it seems something similar happens for other cognitive functions. Although their test scores didn’t change with the seasons, activity in some brain areas showed a consistent seasonal pattern among the volunteers: brain activity peaked in the summer on the attention task and in the autumn on the memory task. Many seasonally changing factors could regulate such a pattern, including day length, temperature, humidity, social interaction and physical activity. Since these weren’t all controlled for in the study, it’s impossible to say what is responsible for the seasonal changes seen.

12-23-15 Sleep isn't needed to create long-term memories – just time out
Sleep isn't needed to create long-term memories – just time out
Sitting for 10 minutes with no stimulation helps people remember new information, suggesting we consolidate memories without the need to sleep on it. Need to remember something important? Take a break. A proper one – no TV or flicking through your phone messages. It seems that resting in a quiet room for 10 minutes without stimulation can boost our ability to remember new information. The effect is particularly strong in people with amnesia, suggesting that they may not have lost the ability to form new memories after all. “A lot of people think the brain is a muscle that needs to be continually stimulated, but perhaps that’s not the best way,” says Michaela Dewar at Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh, UK. New memories are fragile. They need to be consolidated before being committed to long-term storage, a process thought to happen while we sleep. But at least some consolidation may occur while we’re awake, says Dewar – all you need is a timeout.

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Scientific Secrets for a Powerful Memory
Lectures by Peter M. Vishton

Sioux Falls Atheists endorse Scientific Secrets for a Powerful Memory
for showing how we can train ourselves to have a better memory
for helping to deal with the more complex world of today.