Sioux Falls Atheists
Sioux Falls Atheists and Atheism, Agnostics and Humanism

Sioux Falls Atheists endorse Escape from a Nazi Death Camp for
showing the courage that the death camp inmates, Jews and
Russians, had to have to make this escape possible.

Escape from a Nazi Death Camp
The True Story of the Sobibor Uprising

Escape from a Nazi Death Camp (2014) - 60 minutes
Escape from a Nazi Death Camp at Amazon.com

The True Story of the Sobibor Uprising

The secret Nazi death camp at Sobibor was created solely for the mass extermination of Jews. But on the 14th of October 1943, the inmates fought back in the biggest and most successful prison outbreak of the Second World War. Told through the firsthand accounts of four survivors -- Toivi Blatt, Phillip Bialowitz, Selma Engel-Wijnberg, and former Russian POW Semjon Rozenfeld -- and using dramatic reenactments, Escape From a Nazi Death Camp recounts the true horror of life at Sobibor, and the desperation, determination, and courage of its prisoners.

Of the 600 inmates present on the day of the escape, 300 escaped into the forest surrounding Sobibor. Of that 300, many were shot, turned in, murdered, or captured by Nazis. Around 50 survived the war and of that 50, only a handful are still alive. Now in their 80s and 90s, this is their last chance to reveal, in their own words, the true story of the day they escaped certain death to freedom.

4-4-16 Sobibor Nazi death camp survivor Schelvis dies at 95
Sobibor Nazi death camp survivor Schelvis dies at 95
The last Dutch survivor of the Nazi extermination camp at Sobibor, Jules Schelvis, has died at his home aged 95. After World War Two he worked to document what happened at Sobibor, one of three secret death camps built by the Nazis in occupied eastern Poland. About 250,000 people, mainly Jews, were murdered there from 1942-43. More than 34,000 were from the Netherlands. Jules Schelvis lost most of his family in the war and survived six more camps until he was finally freed in 1945.

11-6-15 Thomas Blatt 1927–2015: The Nazi death camp inmate who survived a daring escape
Thomas Blatt 1927–2015: The Nazi death camp inmate who survived a daring escapeg
Thomas Blatt was sure he’d die on the evening of Oct. 14, 1943. He was a 16-year-old Jewish inmate at the Nazis’ Sobibor death camp and about to take part in a mass revolt. “We had no dreams of liberation,” Blatt later wrote of his 600 fellow prisoners. “We hoped merely to destroy the camp and die from bullets rather than gas.” The prisoners overpowered and killed many of the camp’s SS guards, but suffered heavy losses. Blatt was one of only 50 inmates who survived the escape and the war, and he remained haunted by Sobibor for the rest of his life. “I’m still there,” he said in 2010, “in my dreams, in everything.”
Born in eastern Poland, Blatt and his family were sent to a ghetto by the Nazis in 1942 and then deported to Sobibor, southwest of Warsaw. “His parents and 10-year-old brother, Henryk, were immediately killed,” said The New York Times. Blatt was spared because the camp commander needed a shoeshine boy. After escaping, he fought with partisans against the Germans and eventually immigrated to California, where he ran three electronics shops.
Blatt spent decades raising awareness about Sobibor, and in 2010 he testified in Germany at the trial of John Demjanjuk—a retired Ohio autoworker, originally from Ukraine, accused of working as a guard at the Treblinka, Majdanek, and Sobibor camps. Demjanjuk was convicted of being an accessory to thousands of murders but remained free on appeal, and died in 2012. “Demjanjuk’s imprisonment was less important to Blatt than the trial itself,” said WashingtonPost.com. “The trial is what matters to me,” he said in 2011. “The world should find out how it was at Sobibor.”

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Escape from a Nazi Death Camp
The True Story of the Sobibor Uprising

Sioux Falls Atheists endorse Escape from a Nazi Death Camp for
showing the courage that the death camp inmates, Jews and
Russians, had to have to make this escape possible.